Michelin Guide photo of this dessert from a luxury restaurant goes viral

Yes, you are supposed to eat it

Nobody had ever laughed that hard at a phrase printed in the Michelin Guide. Until yesterday.

Much to the amusement of readers, the community manager of the guide’s UK edition unleashed his inner troll – while employing the dry humour typical of the British – by captioning the image ‘Enough now’.

It might seem like the Michelin Guide is playing some kind of joke on us, but the photo is genuine. This flip-flop is used to serve a dessert invented by chef Peter Maria Schnurr at the Restaurant Falco in Leipzig in Germany. The German Michelin Guide has awarded the restaurant two stars and given it a glowing review:

‘He has his own personal style, which makes him one of the most creative chefs in German cuisine. (…) The composition of his dishes couldn’t be more harmonious and his presentations are a real feast for the senses.’

This was the online reaction:

The dish had already caused a sensation last year after food writer Elizabeth Auerbach tweeted a photo of it from a German food magazine.

But it looks like this visual ‘feast’ was a bit much for the compilers of the British edition. Sitting on this plastic, Italian-flagged flip-flop are two green spheres. Now these might look, at first, like the rubber balls you play beach tennis with, but they’re actually chocolate-coated raspberry sorbet balls, sitting on a layer of edible sand.

It probably tastes incredible, but frankly the presentation hits you like a flip-flop to the chops. 

Chef Schnurr, however, probably remains unruffled by the criticisms, judging by the description of him on the restaurant’s website:

‘Who’s Schurr? On the 27th floor, just before the heaven, he is (almost) God.’

‘Where he cooks? No, he resided in Leipzig between the 26th floor and the sky.’ His word is law, his language is the imagination.’

‘His scale is not the gastronomic mediocrity, but the dance between the worlds.’

For €166 or €199 you can try Schnurr’s five or seven-course meals which include dishes with such risqué names as ‘Chills and Fever’, ‘Goblet of Fire’, ‘Bondage’ and ‘Inferno’.


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